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Workload
The Adult Services Division of Marion Superior Court Probation Department is responsible for the investigation, processing, and supervision of more than 15, 000 individuals each year.
 
As a direct consequence of the high volume of Court assignments, the probation officers work in specialized units and operate from three distinct locations in the County.
 
Structure
The division consists of eight supervision units, an intake unit, a unit of Court and administrative officers, two units of Presentence Investigators, and Community Service Unit.
 
State Requirements
Felony convictions above the lowest level require department offices to compete a comprehensive report, which serves as a diagnosis for the correctional process.
Officers conducting supervision complete extensive training to become certified as substance abuse specialist in observance of State regulations for alcohol and drug services.
 
Every officer in the division is required to complete specialized training in order to properly administer the State risk assessment instrument for community supervision.
 
Operations
Probation Officers in the Adult Division perform their duties in specialized assignments.  These include pre-sentence investigations, intake processing, Court covering, and casework.  In order to effectively address the variety of casework needs, officers are assigned to specific areas such as the supervision of sex offenders, homeless, mental health, and transfers to and from other jurisdictions.
 
A large number of probationers do not begin their term of supervision until they have completed a more restrictive portion of their sentence, such as a term of imprisonment, work release, or electronic monitoring which is administered by either the Indiana Department of Correction or Marion County Community Corrections.  During that initial period, these cases are monitored by probation officers to insure that the transition to probation supervision is not interrupted. 
 
Each year adult probation performs more than 100,000 hours of community service as a condition of probation.  The majority of those hours are completed on work crews supervised by member of the probation staff.  As a valuable community resource, the crews are able to perform large projects such as cleaning a neighborhood, painting a building, or recycling tires.