Planning Glossary of Terms
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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Many sources of information have been used to prepare this glossary. Included are the Indianapolis Star newspaper; the Indianapolis Business Journal ; the Unigov Handbook , prepared by the League of Women Voters; The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis, prepared by The Polis Center at IUPUI ; the Dictionary of Banking Terms , prepared by Barron's Business Guides; the Rainbow BooK (Central Indiana Human Services Database), prepared by the Information and Referral Network, Inc.; Principles and Practices of Urban Planning, prepared by the Institute for Training in Municipal Administration; Land Use Task Force of the Indiana Rural Development Council, Directory of Terms; An Inventory of Central Indiana's Economic Development Organizations, prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Technology Partnership Practice; and many documents prepared by the staff of the Department of Metropolitan Development and other agencies listed below.  Also the helpful staff members of the Department of Metropolitan Development have contributed a great deal to the information provided here.

A

ABC: See Administrative Building Council and Alcoholic Beverage Commission below.

ADA: See Americans with Disabilities Act below.

Administrative Building Council (ABC): An agency of state government which has responsibility for assuring construction of safe buildings. ABC prepares all state wide building codes. It reviews construction plans for all buildings except family farm buildings and one or two family dwellings. The agency also performs inspections when requested by a local governmental unit. Building codes are adopted and staff activities are directed by a 13-member council which is appointed by the Governor. For more information contact Fire and Building Services at 232-6422.

ADT: See Average Daily Traffic Volume below.

Affordable Housing: A housing unit (owned or rented) that costs the occupants less than 30% of the occupants income. Numbers vary based on family size.

Alcoholic Beverage Commission: A state agency which is charged with administering and enforcing the laws governing the manufacture, distribution, and sale of alcoholic beverages. For more information contact the ABC at 232-2430. The Alcoholic Beverage Board of Marion County (local board) may be contacted in writing in care of the Marion County Circuit Court Clerk's office in Room W-122 of the City-County Building.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): The Americans with Disabilities Act gives civil rights protections to individuals with disabilities similar to those provided to individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age, and religion. It guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in public accommodations, employment, transportation, state, and local government services, and telecommunications. The Title I employment provisions apply to private employers, state, and local governments, employment agencies, and labor unions. Employers with fifteen or more employees are covered. For more information contact the Region V office at (312) 413-7756.

Average Daily Traffic Volume (ADT): The average number of vehicles passing a specific point during a 24- hour period. For information regarding traffic volumes in Indianapolis, contact Kevin Mayfield at 327-5135.

B

BAGI: See Builders Association of Greater Indianapolis below.

Benchmark: A point of reference from which measurements are made.

BOS Community Development Corporation: A community development corporation in the northwest part of downtown Indianapolis. Formed in 1982 the BOS Community Development Corporation was created with the purpose of improving the quality of life in the community. Other names used to describe this neighborhood area are Midtown, Indiana Avenue, and MEDIC (Midtown Economic Development and Industrial Corporation). Smaller neighborhoods within the BOS area are the Upper Canal Neighborhood Association, MEDIC, and the Ransom Place Neighborhood Association. For more information contact BOS, 719 Indiana Avenue, Suite 360, Indianapolis, IN 46202 at 635-2913.

Bridges to Success (BTS): A collaborative effort of Indianapolis Public Schools, United Way, City of Indianapolis, and businesses and service providers. The goal of BTS is to make the school a focal point of community activity and to more effectively meet the needs of children and their families through the development and enhancement of school-linked services. For more information contact BTS at 921-1281.

Broad Ripple: A neighborhood and commercial area north of downtown Indianapolis. Division of Planning staff prepared the Broad Ripple Village Plan Update in 1997.

Brownfield: Abandoned, idled, or under-utilized industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination. For more information contact Kyle Hendrix at 327-5845.

BTS: See Bridges to Success above.

Builders Association of Greater Indianapolis (BAGI): BAGI offers a builders referral service and provides for customer complaint procedures involving member building contractors and construction companies who build or remodel homes. For more information contact BAGI at 236-6330.

Building Better Neighborhoods: The program whereby City departments make capital investments in the community. Examples are bridge repair and replacement, curb and sidewalk repair and replacement, traffic signal improvements, police and fire station construction, wastewater treatment projects, flood and drainage projects, park improvements, public housing improvements, road construction and repair, and other neighborhood and housing improvement projects. In the past this program has been called the Capital Improvements Program. Even though most City departments have developed components of the Building Better Neighborhoods program, it is suggested that people with questions begin with DCAM at 327-5090.

Building Codes: Local government regulations that prescribe minimum standards for the construction and maintenance of buildings.

Building Permit: A permit issued by the Division of Permits of the Department of Metropolitan Development. Various types of building permits authorize structural, electrical, heating and cooling, plumbing, or wrecking work. For more information contact the Division of Permits at 327-8700.

Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood: A neighborhood area northwest of downtown Indianapolis. Division of Planning staff prepared the Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Plan in 1985.

C

CAC: See Citizens Advisory Committee below.

CADD: See Computer-Aided Design and Drafting below.

CAFE: See Community Alliance of the Far Eastside below.

CAGI: See Community Action of Greater Indianapolis below.

Capital Improvement Board (CIB): A board that is empowered to finance and manage public capital improvements in Marion County. Examples are the Convention Center and RCA Dome, Victory Field, Market Square Arena, and the new Conseco Fieldhouse. For more information call 262-3410.

Capital Improvement Program (CIP): See Building Better Neighborhoods above.

CBD: See Central Business District below.

CCI: See Community Centers of Indianapolis below.

CDBG: See Community Development Block Grant below.

CDC: See Community Development Corporation below.

CDCU: See Community Development Credit Union below.

CDFI: See Community Development Financial Institution below.

CDFS: See Division of Community Development and Financial Services below.

CEF: See Community Enhancement Fund below.

CPTED: See Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design below.

Center for Urban Policy and the Environment (CUPE): A part of Indiana University that has a mission to work with state and local governments and their associations, neighborhood and community organizations, community leaders, and business and civic organizations in Indiana to identify issues, analyze options, and develop the capacity to respond to challenges. For more information contact CUPE at 261-3004.

Center Township: A 27,367 acre township located in the center of Marion County. Center Township had a 1980 population of 208,624 and a 1990 population of 182,140. The Center Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1983. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Central Business District (CBD): A term generally used to describe the heart of an urban downtown. In Indianapolis, the U.S. Census defines the CBD as Census tracts 3541, 3542, 3543, 3562, and 3563.

Central Indiana Bicycling Association (CIBA): A not-for-profit organization of people who enjoy bicycle riding. They promote bicycle touring and conduct regularly scheduled rides that are open to the public. For more information call 327-2453.

Central Indiana Corporate Partnership (CICP): The Central Indiana Corporate Partnership is intended as a forum for CEO's for setting broad priorities for initiatives affecting the growth and vitality of the region and to direct corporate resources toward those initiatives that will have the most positive impact on the identified priorities. The CICP was formally organized in July 1999 as a successor organization to the Corporate Community Council.

Members include CEO's from a geographic region that includes Bloomington, Lafayette, Anderson, Muncie, Columbus, Shelbyville, Carmel, and Indianapolis. For more information contact CICP at 638-2440.

Central Indiana Regional Citizens League (CIRCL): A general citizen-based organization that provides the means for citizens to have input into the decisions affecting quality of life issues in central Indiana. Even though the group has only been in operation for a year, CIRCL already has a membership of 330 groups and individuals. For more information call 921-1282.

CERCLIS: See Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation Liability Information System below.

Certificate of Appropriateness: A certificate issued by the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission (IHPC) authorizing exterior changes to building and grounds in locally designated historic areas. A certificate of appropriateness is needed before a building permit allowing construction or demolition is issued for these areas. The certificate reflects a determination that the changes are in keeping with the historic character of the area and are appropriate to the building, site, or streetscape. For more information contact IHPC at 327-4406.

Certificate of Authorization: A certificate issued by the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission in cases in which undertaking the appropriate action would "result in substantial hardship or deprive the owner of all reasonable use and benefit of the subject property." Allowance is also made for those proposed changes that, while inappropriate, would have an insubstantial effect upon the historic character of the area.

Charitable Choice: The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 devolves welfare authority to the states within a framework compromised of several basic guidelines. A key feature of this welfare reform law is the charitable choice provision, which encourages states to utilize charitable and faith-based organizations in serving the poor and needy.

Charrette: An intensive design session conducted in a workshop atmosphere. The Division of Planning has participated in a number of charrettes. For more information contact Bob Wilch at 327-5115.

CHDO: See Community Housing Development Organization below.

CHINS: Child in need of services

CHIP: See Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention below.

CHSP: See Coalition for Human Services Planning below.

CIB: See Capital Improvement Board above.

CIBA: See Central Indiana Bicycling Association above.

CICOA the Access Network: Formerly Central Indiana Council on Aging, this agency serves persons 60 years of age and older. Programs included are Indy Senior Classic, Senior Enterprises, Hot Lunches, Home-Delivered Meals, Home Health Aide, Senior care Management, CHOICE, Homemaker Services, Signal of Security, and the Senior Information and Assistance Center. For more information call 254- 5465.

CICP: See Central Indiana Corporate Partnership above.

CIP or Capital Improvement Program: See Building Better Neighborhoods above.

CIRCL: See Central Indiana Regional Citizens League above.

Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC): A citizens' group formed in 1994 to advise the Indianapolis Regional Transportation Council. The committee meets quarterly to discuss transportation issues and MPO activities. The meetings are open to the public. For more information call Mike Peoni at 327-5133.

Citizens Neighborhood: A neighborhood north of downtown Indianapolis. See King Park Development Corporation and Citizens Neighborhood Coalition below.

Citizens Neighborhood Coalition: A neighborhood umbrella organization north of downtown Indianapolis. This organization is a part of the NEI program described below. See King Park Development Corporation below.

CMS: See Congestion Management System below.

Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention (CHIP): A coalition of many different organizations and individuals working together to establish homeless prevention programs and help keep families from losing their homes. CHIP's mission is to …."mobilize, advocate, and empower community collaboration towards the elimination of homelessness and foster an effective system of homeless prevention and intervention in the greater Indianapolis area." Activities include conducting needs assessments and community education campaigns, advocating for change, being a voice on behalf of homeless persons and housing issues, helping to secure additional resources for housing and homeless programs, recruiting congregations and corporations in the effort to end homelessness, promoting ways to meet the housing needs of the most vulnerable citizens, providing training and technical assistance, collecting and sharing examples of effective programs and recognizing quality programs, and serving as a planning agency for homeless issues. For more information contact CHIP at 630-0853.

Coalition for Human Services Planning (CHSP): A public-private network of local human service funders formed in 1977 to provide a forum for major community institutions concerned with social policy issues and/or financing human services. Through cooperative efforts it is the intent of the CHSP to more effectively impact human needs and maximally utilize resources. Its goal is to promote better human services through improved funding coordination, information sharing and joint planning and development. Coalition membership includes the chief executive (or designated representative) of United Way of Central Indiana, the Indianapolis Foundation, Lilly Endowment, the Health Foundation, Central Indiana Council on Aging, the Moriah Fund, the Mayor's office, the Governor's office, the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee, and the Community Service Council. The Mayor chairs the Coalition and it is staffed by the Community Service Council.

Current collaborative efforts include the:

  1. Outcome-Based Education Initiative
  2. Social Assets and Vulnerabilities Indicators (SAVI) database
  3. Community Assets and Needs Report (CANR)
  4. Drug Free Marion County
  5. Winter Assistance Fund

Most recent projects during the past four years include:

  1. Provision of an outcomes seminar for all CHSP members and selected other public office holders and staff.
  2. Preparation of the Community Facility Infrastructure Plan study.
  3. Provision of planning support for the restructuring of Marion County Commission on Youth.
  4. Creation, research, selection of implementing organization, funding and monitoring for the Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center (INRC)
  5. Preparation of the Indianapolis Homeless Prevention Initiative study, Linkages, resulting in the creation of the Coalition for Homeless Intervention and Prevention (CHIP).

COLAP: See Community Organizations Legal Assistance Project, Inc. below.

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO): An overflow of the combined sanitary and storm sewers, usually during periods of heavy rain.

Commercial Cluster: A land use plan category recommending "strip-type" retail and service businesses oriented along roadways. The zoning plan for each particular location should be consulted for recommended zoning classification in order to ensure compatible intensity of commercial uses.

Community Action of Greater Indianapolis (CAGI): An agency that offers such services as seasonal heating assistance, weatherization and housing, Project Head Start, and the Foster Grandparent Program. For more information call 327-7700.

Community Alliance of the Far Eastside (CAFE): A recent merger of the former Greenleaf Community Center and the Far Eastside Community Development Council (FESCDC) on the far east side of Indianapolis formed CAFE. Greenleaf was a Community Centers of Indianapolis facility and FESCDC was a community development corporation. Both organizations have worked together to improve the quality of life in the neighborhood. The Far Eastside neighborhood was the recipient of a Neighborhood Preservation Initiative (NPI) grant in 1994 from the Pew Charitable Trust. This money was used to set about projects and programs aimed at not only improving the Far Eastside neighborhood, but also providing examples of initiatives that other similar neighborhoods might undertake for neighborhood improvement. The Division of Planning staff prepared the Far Eastside Neighborhood Plan in 1996. For more information contact Christie Gillespie Williams at 890-3288.

Community Centers of Indianapolis (CCI): An agency that coordinates the efforts of multi-service and community centers in Indianapolis. The centers offer a vast array of human services to bring programs to people of all ages; to link up social, cultural, educational, and recreational needs; and to offer solutions that enrich the community. For more information contact CCI at 638-3360.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG): As an entitlement city, Indianapolis annually receives HUD- sponsored CDBG moneys. Eligible programs and projects include a wide range of community and economic development activities aimed at revitalizing decayed urban areas and benefiting low- and moderate-income persons. Indianapolis receives approximately $11million in CDBG funds each year. The grants management team of the Division of Community Development and Financial Services administers these funds for the City. For more information call 327-5151.

Community Development Corporation (CDC): A nonprofit organization usually established by concerns citizens who reside in a decaying or blighted neighborhood. The purpose of the organization is to engage in development activities; such as home owner repair, home rehabilitation, new home construction, and commercial revitalization projects. For more information regarding Indianapolis CDCs contact INHP at 925-1400.

Community Development Credit Union (CDCU): CDCUs are federally regulated financial cooperatives owned and operated by lower income persons to serve the credit and financial services needs of their members. The members often have limited access to other financial institutions.

Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI): CDFIs link conventional financial services to persons of lower income to fill credit, investment and savings gaps; act as partners to other private and public financial sources, and advocate more private sector investment in distressed economies.

Community Enhancement Fund (CEF): A program administered through the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee (GIPC). CEF provides a source of funding for community projects. For more information call 327-3860.

Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO): Private nonprofit organizations that have among their purposes the provision of decent housing that is affordable to low-income and moderate-income persons. Organizations that receive HOME funds must be CHDOs.

Community Organizations Legal Assistance Project, Inc. (COLAP): An agency that empowers low income people by facilitating the delivery of needed pro-bono legal services and other technical assistance to nonprofit community organizations serving low- income neighborhoods. For more information contact COLAP at 267-8997.

Community Park: A land use plan category recommending a park of between 25 and 100 acres that serves an area larger than the immediately surrounding neighborhood. A community park usually includes facilities such as a recreation center, swimming pool, and picnic area.

Community Reinvestment Act (CRA): A federal law adopted in 1977 requiring mortgage lenders to demonstrate their commitment to home mortgage financing in economically disadvantaged areas.

Community Service Council (CSC): The community planning arm of the United Way that also provides problem- solving, data resources, and legislative information concerning human services in Marion and adjacent counties. For more information call 923- 1466.

Community Shopping Center: A land use plan category recommending a commercial center serving an area larger than just the surrounding neighborhood with a large supermarket, discount store, or department store as the anchor.

Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation Liability Information System (CERCLIS): A list which includes properties across the nation that may contain environmental contamination. For more information contact the Indiana Department of Environmental Management at 308-3045.

Comprehensive Plan Segment (CPS): A segment of the Comprehensive Plan for Marion County. Comprehensive plan segments become a part of City policy when adopted by the Metropolitan Development Commission. Adopted Comprehensive plan segments have CPS numbers assigned to them. Examples of comprehensive plan segments are neighborhood plans, township plans, corridor plans, park master plans, and the Official Thoroughfare Plan.

Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD): An automated system for producing drawings and graphics.

Congestion Management System (CMS): A study that identifies locations of traffic congestion and provides methods to monitor it. Methods of mitigating negative impacts are recommended. The CMS replaced the Transportation Management System.

Concord Community Development Corporation: A community development corporation south of downtown Indianapolis. Formed in 1993 Concord CDC has helped to improve the neighborhood environment with numerous projects including construction of new houses, renovation of existing houses, sponsoring youth programs, and other general neighborhood improvements. For more information contact Concord Neighborhood Development Corporation, 1310 S. Meridian, Indianapolis, IN 46225 at 637-4376.

Concord neighborhood: A neighborhood south of downtown Indianapolis. See Concord Community Development Corporation above.

Consolidated Plan (CP): The application for federal funds for the Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership, and Emergency Shelter Grant. Also it is the five year strategy for housing and community development, and it is the one year action plan for use of the funds listed above. For more information call 327-5151.

Continuum of Care or Support Continuum: A concept for comprehensively dealing with issues related to the homeless population. HUD has supported the continuum of care concept through the McKinney Act programs. The continuum of care concept is a response to the fact that homelessness involves a variety of unmet physical, economic, social, and medical needs. Fundamental components consist of prevention strategies; an emergency shelter and assessment effort, transitional housing and necessary social services, and permanent housing or permanent supportive housing arrangements.

CPS: See Comprehensive Plan Segment above.

CRA: See Community Reinvestment Act above.

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED): Community design based on the relationship between the physical environment and crime. CPTED usually involves the use of three principles: natural surveillance (by placing physical features, activities, and people to maximize visibility); natural access control (through the judicial placement of entrances, exits, fencing, landscaping, and lighting); and territorial reinforcement (using buildings, fences, pavement, signs, and landscaping to express ownership).

CSC: See Community Service Council above.

CSO: See Combined Sewer Overflow above.

CUPE: See Center for Urban Policy and the Environment above.

D

Database: Stored information that is usually kept in the form of a computer table, chart, or file.

DCAM: See Department of Capital Asset Management below.

Decatur Township: A 20,695 acre township located in the southwest part of Marion County. Decatur Township had a 1980 population of 19,426 and a 1990 population of 21,092. The Decatur Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1991. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Department of Capital Asset Management (DCAM): A City department that plans, designs, and constructs streets and roads in Marion County. DCAM is also responsible for planning infrastructure and designing sanitary and storm water systems, wastewater treatment systems, drains and levees, and completing flood control projects. For more information call 327-5090.

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): A cabinet-level federal agency that promotes housing and urban development in the United States through direct loans, mortgage insurance, and other programs. To contact the Indianapolis HUD office call 226- 6303.

Department of Metropolitan Development (DMD): A City department that plans and implements projects and services focused on public safety, jobs and economic development, affordable housing, and the empowerment of neighborhoods through citizen participation. For more information call 327-3698.

Department of Natural Resources (DNR): A state agency with responsibility for acquisition, improvement, and upkeep of the state's natural resources, such as wetlands, waterways, agricultural lands, wildlife, plant communities, and recreation lands. Also DNR has responsibilities for the state's historic and cultural sites. For more information call 232-4200.

Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) or Indy Parks: A City department with responsibility for the acquisition, improvement, and upkeep of the city's parks. Also DPR facilitates sports and recreation programs for the residents of Indianapolis. For more information call 327-0000.

Department of Public Safety (DPS): A City department that maintains order and protects the rights and property of Indianapolis citizens. The department's divisions include Police, Fire, Emergency Management Planning, Animal Control, and Weights and Measures. For more information call 327-5090.

Department of Public Works (DPW): A City department that is responsible for sanitation, including trash pickup and sewage disposal. Other activities include wastewater treatment and disposal, maintenance of infrastructure, street maintenance, and the protection of City environmental resources. For more information call 327-4000.

Development Monitoring System (DMS): A system of information gathered from the City's permit processes. Information available from the Development Monitoring System includes:

  1. the number of housing permits issued by township or census tract.
  2. the number of commercial permits issued by township.
  3. the number of industrial permits issued by township.
  4. the number of new and demolished housing units listed by single, duplex, multi-family, and condominiums construction type.
  5. the amount of new retail, office, and other commercial space.
  6. the amount of new manufacturing and warehouse space.
  7. the value of new commercial space.
  8. the value of new industrial.
  9. the value of the total demolished commercial space.
Information is not available for the cities of Beech Grove, Lawrence, Speedway, and Southport. The Division regularly prepares housing starts and losses and other similar reports based on the DMS information. For more information call Robert Uhlenhake at 327-5685.

Division of Community Development and Financial Services (CDFS): A division of the Department of Metropolitan Development with responsibility for seeking federal grants and other funds and monitoring their use in community development efforts. Also CDFS is responsible for the City's participation in certain human service programs and for supporting the Department's budgetary and financial needs. For more information call 327-5151.

Division of Neighborhood Services: A division of the Department of Metropolitan Development that includes Current Planning and the Township Administrators. For more information regarding Current Planning call 327-5155. For the Township Administrators call 327-5039.

Division of Permits: A division of the Department of Metropolitan Development that is responsible for assuring that construction activity in the city complies with state and municipal building standards. For more information contact the Division of Permits at 327-8700.

Division of Planning (DOP): A division of the Department of Metropolitan Development that analyzes community conditions, makes projections, and recommends plans for private and public projects. For more information call 327-5151.

DMD: See Department of Metropolitan Development above.

DMS: See Development Monitoring Systemabove.

DNR: See Department of Natural Resources above.

DOP: See Division of Planning above.

DPR: See Department of Parks and Recreation above.

DPS: See Department of Public Safety above.

DPW: See Department of Public Works above.

E

Eastside Community Investments (ECI): A community development corporation east of downtown Indianapolis. Through the efforts of Near East Side Community Organization (NESCO), ECI was created in 1976 for an original mission of improving housing stock and creating jobs. Other names used to describe this neighborhood area are Highland-Brookside, NESCO, and the Near Eastside. Smaller neighborhoods within the ECI area are the Arsenal Heights Civic League, Brookside Bunch Neighborhood Association, Brookside Neighborhood Association, Cottage Home Neighborhood Association, Holy Cross-Westminster Neighborhood Association, Springdale Neighborhood Association, Windsor Park Neighborhood Association, and the Woodruff Place Civic League. The Division of Planning prepared the Highland-Brookside Housing Improvement and Neighborhood Plan in 1993. For more information contact ECI, 26 N. Arsenal Street, Indianapolis, IN 46201 at 637-7300.

ECI: See Eastside Community Investments above.

Economic Development Administration (EDA): The original purpose of this federal agency was to deal with the problems of long-term unemployment and underemployment in rural areas. The role of EDA has subsequently been expanded to include economic development assistance to cities and urban areas as well as rural areas. A local government may apply for aid under the public works, technical assistance, and planning programs, and encourage private business to apply for aid through EDA's business development program.

Economic Development Area (EDA): An area similar to a redevelopment area (see below), but one that does not have the use of eminent domain.

Economic Impact Statement (EIS): An analysis of certain existing or proposed developments to determine their economic impact on the community.

EDA: See Economic Development Administration and Economic Development Area below.

EEO: See Equal Employment Opportunity below.

EIS: See Economic Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Statement.

Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG): A program funded under the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and administered by HUD. It is designed to help improve the quality of existing emergency shelters for the homeless, to help make available additional emergency shelters, to help meet the costs of operating emergency shelters, and to provide certain essential social services to homeless individuals, so that these persons have access not only to safe and sanitary shelter, but also the supportive services and other kinds of assistance they need to improve their situations. The program is also intended to restrict the increase of homelessness through the funding of preventive programs and activities. The grants management team of the Division of Community Development and Financial Services administers these funds for the City. For more information call 327-5151.

Eminent Domain: The right of a government to acquire the lands and rights necessary for a public use if the government is unable to agree with the owner of the land or right on damages or the purchase price. The government may exercise eminent domain to condemn the land or right necessary to carry out a public use.

Empowerment Zones: See Enterprise Communities below.

Enterprise Communities: The Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993 authorized certain tax incentives to businesses located within designated distressed areas in order to stimulate economic activity and to encourage the hiring of individuals who reside within these areas. There are 95 "lower tier" enterprise communities in the United States which came about as a part of the 1993 legislation which created enterprise zones consisting of up to nine empowerment zones. Nationally, the program for urban areas is administered by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Indianapolis was recently awarded enterprise community designation for an area located within several central city neighborhoods including all or portions of Highland-Brookside, Martindale- Brightwood, Citizens, Near North, Mapleton-Fall Creek, United North East, and UNWA. For more information about Indianapolis' Enterprise Community, contact Jennie Fults at 327-5110.

Enterprise Community: A federally designated area in a community that receives funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development in order to develop economic opportunities for the residents as well as to revitalize the area. Community partnerships are used to accomplish goals.

Enterprise Zone: See Urban Enterprise Association below.

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS): An analysis of certain existing or proposed developments to determine their impact on the surrounding environment.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): A federal agency with the mission to protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, i.e. air, water, and land, upon which life depends. EPA works to ensure that: 1.) national efforts to reduce environmental risk are based on the best available scientific information; 2.) federal laws protecting human health and the environment are enforced fairly and effectively; 3.) environmental protection is an integral consideration in U.S. policies concerning natural resources, human health, economic growth, energy, transportation, agriculture, industry, and international trade, and these factors are similarly considered in establishing environmental policy; 4.) all parts of society-communities, individuals, business, state, and local governments, tribal governments-have access to accurate information sufficient to effectively participate in managing human health and environmental risks; 5.) environmental protection contributes to making our communities and ecosystems diverse, sustainable, and economically productive; and 6.) the United States plays a leadership role in working with other nations to protect the global environment.

EPA: See Environmental Protection Agency above.

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO): Employment that does not discriminate against any employee or job applicant because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, physical or mental handicap, or age.

ESG: See Emergency Shelter Grant above.

Excluded Cities and Towns: The three cities of Beech Grove, Lawrence, and Southport and the town of Speedway that were not annexed into the Consolidated City of Indianapolis

F

FAA: See Federal Aviation Administration below.

Fall Creek Place: See Home Ownership Zone below.

Fannie Mae: Fannie Mae is a New York Stock Exchange company and the largest non-bank financial services company in the world. It operates pursuant to a federal charter and is the nation's largest source of financing for home mortgages. Fannie Mae is working to shrink the nation's "homeownership gaps" through a $2 trillion "American Dream Commitment" to increase homeownership rates and serve 18 million targeted American families by the end of the decade. Since 1968, Fannie Mae has provided $3.0 trillion of mortgage financing for over 37 million families. For more information about Fannie Mae call 639-7915 or visit the website http://www.fanniemae.com.

Far From Home Foundation: The only Indianapolis agency that supplies transitional housing for homeless military veterans, who make up a large percentage of the city's homeless. The foundation's Indiana chapter opened its first group home in 1996. Far From Home receives funds through various public and private sources. The agency recently negotiated to receive several houses from the city through an agreement in which the group gives up its right to claim military housing vacated when the Naval Air Warfare Center was privatized. For more information contact Far From Home at 767-4056.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA): A federal agency with responsibility for overseeing air travel in the United States. The FAA provides federal funding to the Indianapolis Airport Authority.

Federal Fair Housing Law: In accordance with the Federal Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988, this law states it is illegal to discriminate in housing on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, family status, or national origin.

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA): A federal agency with responsibility for highway planning and construction in the United States. The FHWA acts as a non-voting member of the IRTC and provides guidance on the interpretation and implementation of federal transportation planning regulations.

Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB): A central credit system for savings and loan institutions created in 1932. The system was restructured in 1989 and now district banks are required to establish an affordable housing program to finance below-market mortgages to low income borrowers. For more information contact the FHLB at 465-0200.

FESCDC: See Community Alliance of the Far Eastside above.

FHLB: See Federal Home Loan Bank above.

FHTTF: See Fort Harrison Transition Task Force below.

FWA: See Federal Highway Administration above.

FLIP Funds: See Fund for Landmark Indianapolis Properties below.

Fort Harrison Reuse Authority (FHRA): The entity responsible for redeveloping the approximately 550 acres and 250 buildings of base property that became available at Fort Harrison. The FHRA was created under state authorizing legislation in 1995. It is comprised of a five-member board with one appointee of the Mayor of Indianapolis, one appointee of the Mayor of Lawrence, one appointee of the City-County Council, one appointee of the Lawrence Common Council, and one appointee of the Board of County Commissioners. For more information contact FHRA at 377-3400.

Fort Harrison Transition Task Force (FHTTF): A joint effort of the City of Lawrence, City of Indianapolis, and the State of Indiana with the purpose to develop a plan to guide the transfer of land and resources of Fort Harrison from military uses to civilian ones while meeting the needs of the many interested parties. The operations of the FHTTF were funded by the Department of Defense (Office of Economic Adjustment) with matching contributions by Lawrence, Indianapolis, and the State of Indiana. FHTTF has been succeeded by the Fort Harrison Reuse Authority (see above).

Fountain Square Neighborhood: A neighborhood area southeast of downtown Indianapolis. See Southeastern Neighborhood below.

FPA: See Front Porch Alliance below.

Franklin Township: A 26,987 acre township located in the southeast part of Marion County. Franklin Township had a 1980 population of 16,477 and a 1990 population of 21,458. The Franklin Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1991. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Front Porch Alliance (FPA): A Goldsmith administration initiative.

Fund for Landmark Indianapolis Properties (FLIP): A fund that Historic Landmarks Foundation has established to acquire historic properties. Historic Landmarks resells these properties to buyers devoted to preserving them. Historic Landmarks remains involved after the sale to provide technical assistance and restoration advice to the buyers, and to monitor any proposed changes to the structure to ensure they are in keeping with its historic integrity. For more information contact Historic Landmarks of Indiana at 639-4534.

G

GAP: See Grant Assistance for Preservation below.

General Obligation Bond (GO Bond): A type of local government bond that can be used for a variety of projects. Proceeds of GO bonds can be issued either directly for economic development purposes or indirectly by providing for infrastructure improvements. The issuance of GO bonds requires approval of taxpayers located within the boundaries of the unit issuing the debt.

Geographic Information System (GIS): A means of producing, analyzing, and storing computerized maps. See Indianapolis Mapping and Geographic Infrastructure System below.

Getting Indianapolis Fit for Tomorrow (GIFT): A study by a committee established by the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce for the following two reasons:

  1. to evaluate extensively the city's infrastructure in order to determine what needs to be done to replace, repair, or maintain the Indianapolis infrastructure to ensure the safety of its citizens and the health of its economy.
  2. to identify what sources of equitable revenue exist or need to be developed to pay for only the essential infrastructure improvements in a ten year period. The findings of the committee were published in June of 1991.

GIFT: See Getting Indianapolis Fit for Tomorrow above.

GIPC: See Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee below.

GIS: See Geographic Information System above.

Global Positioning System: The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of 24 satellites that orbit the Earth. This constellation, when used with a GPS receiver, makes it possible for a person to pinpoint their geographic position. GPS uses these satellites as reference points to calculate positions within meters (actual distance depends on the system being used).

Goal: The end toward which planning and development efforts

GO Bond: See General Obligation Bond above.

GPS: See Global Positioning System above.

Grant Assistance for Preservation (GAP): A program of the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission (IHPC) which is intended to assist low income homeowners in locally designated historic neighborhoods by filling the financial gap between a safe and sound house and a restored house. The intent of these small grants is to assist in the restoration of highly visible exterior architectural features, thus improving the visual character of a house in a revitalizing historic neighborhood.

The GAP program can provide up to $4,000 of assistance per grant award. No match is required, but a project will be given extra points during the scoring process if the owner is willing to make an additional financial commitment.

To qualify for a GAP grant, the application must meet certain requirement and be located in one of the following historic neighborhoods: Chatham Arch, Fletcher Place, Herron Morton Place, Lockerbie Square, Old Northside, St. Joseph, Fayette Street, Ransom Place and New Augusta.

For more information contact the IHPC at 327-4406.

Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee (GIPC): Non-partisan organization of business, civic, religious, and educational leaders which advises the mayor on community concerns. For more information call 327-3860.

H

Habitat for Humanity (HFH): A national organization that has as its mission to work…."in partnership with God and people everywhere, from all walks of life, to develop communities with God's people in need by building and renovating houses, so that there can be decent houses in decent communities in which God's people can live and grow into all that God intended." Since it was established in Indianapolis in 1987, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Indianapolis has built 98 homes. HFH partners with churches, corporations, CDCs, social service agencies, and volunteer groups to accomplish their mission. To qualify for Habitat for Humanity programs, applicants must agree to several provisions and there are income requirements. For more information contact HFH at 636-6777.

Heavy Commercial: A land use plan category recommending commercial uses with extensive outdoor storage and display, such as mobile home sales or sales of heavy construction equipment.

Heavy Industrial: A land use plan category recommending industries that produce smoke, noise, and have outside storage. Because of their nature, they should be located away from residential areas. Some examples are motor truck terminals, concrete manufacturing, scrap metal reprocessing, and auto and truck component manufacturing.

HFH: See Habitat for Humanity above.

Highland-Brookside Neighborhood: A neighborhood east of downtown Indianapolis. See Eastside Community Investments above.

Historic Urban Neighborhoods of Indianapolis (HUNI): A coalition of organized neighborhoods including historic preservation as a part of their agenda and whose purpose it is to:

  1. Provide a forum for the exchange, gathering and dissemination of information, ideas, and experiences between the various neighborhood associations.
  2. Interface with the local and regional governmental units.
  3. To act as a vehicle for implementing positive changes in the neighborhoods.

HUNI member neighborhoods include Arsenal Heights Civic League, Chatham-Arch Neighborhood Association, Cottage Home Neighborhood, Fletcher Place Neighborhood Association, Friends of Historic Fountain Square, Historic Haughville Neighborhood Association, Herron-Morton Place Association, Historic Woodruff Place, Inc., Holy Cross/Westminster Neighborhood Association, Irvington Community Council, Lockerbie Square People's Club, Meridian Park Neighborhood Association, New Northside Neighborhood Association, Old Northside Inc., Ransom Place Neighborhood Association, and St. Joseph Historic Neighborhood Association. For more information contact HUNI at 639-6940.

Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana (HLFI): A statewide, private, non-profit, membership-supported organization established to promote the preservation and restoration of Indiana's architectural and historic heritage. For more information contact the state office at 639-4534.

The Indianapolis Regional Office endeavors to meet the preservation needs of Marion County through advocacy and education. In addition to preparing the Marion County historic structures survey (see page 38), preparing National Register nominations, and providing technical assistance, the Indianapolis Regional Office also operates a revolving loan fund. To contact the HLFI Indianapolis Regional Office call 638-5264.

HLFI: See Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana above.

HMDA: See Home Mortgage Disclosure Act below.

HOME: A program that was enacted as Title II of the National Affordable Housing Act of 1990. It is administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The purposes of HOME are to expand the supply of decent, affordable housing for low- and very low-income families; to build local capacity to carry out affordable housing programs; and to provide for coordinated assistance to participants in the development of affordable low-income housing. The grants management team of the Division of Community Development and Financial Services administers these funds for the City. For more information call 327-5151.

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA): A Federal Reserve regulation requiring depository institutions to make annual disclosure of the location of certain residential loans, to determine whether depository institutions are meeting the credit needs of their local community. The Division of Planning receives information from this reporting process and can produce reports based the information. For more information call 327-5151.

Home Ownership Zone: The Homeownership Zone Initiative (HOZ) allows communities to reclaim vacant and blighted properties, increase homeownership, and promote economic revitalization by creating entire neighborhoods of new, single-family homes, called Homeownership Zones. Communities are encouraged to use New Urbanism design principals by providing for a pedestrian-friendly environment, a mix of incomes and compatible uses, defined neighborhood boundaries and access to jobs and mass transit. One home ownership zone exists in Indianapolis in the King Park area. The area is now called Fall Creek Place.

HOPE 3: A partnership program involving the City of Indianapolis, Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership (INHP) and thirteen Community Development Corporations (CDCs). The programs purpose is to build central Indianapolis neighborhoods by helping first time homebuyers purchase safe and affordable housing. HOPE 3 properties are located in central Indianapolis, mostly in Center Township, but some are located in Wayne, Washington, Lawrence, and Warren Townships. For more information contact Michelle Winfield at 327-5869.

HOPE VI: A U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development demonstration program in the Nearwestside neighborhood. The program provides an alternative to traditional public housing complexes by developing scattered site assisted housing units with support services. These houses are first offered for sale to public housing residents. For more information contact the Indianapolis Housing Agency at 327-8100.

HOPWA: See Housing Opportunities for Persons with Aids below.

Household: A household includes all the persons who occupy a housing unit. The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living together, or any other group of related or unrelated persons who share living arrangements.

Housing Opportunities for Persons with Aids (HOPWA): A program that is funded under the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act and administered by HUD. The program authorizes grants for housing assistance and supportive services for low-income persons with HIV/AIDS and their families. The grants management team of the Division of Community Development and Financial Services administers these funds for the City. For more information call 327-5151.

Housing Starts and Losses: See Development Monitoring System above.

Housing Units: A housing unit is a house, an apartment, a mobile home or trailer, a group of rooms or a single room occupied as separate living quarters or, if vacant, intended for occupancy as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat separately from any other persons in the building and which have direct access from outside the building or through a common hall.

HUD: See Department of Housing and Urban Development above.

HUNI: See Historic Urban Neighborhoods of Indianapolis above.

I

IAA: See Indianapolis Airport Authority below.

IAUW: See Indiana Association of United Ways below.

ICHHI: See Indiana Coalition for Housing and Homeless Issues below.

ICHS: See Indiana Coalition for Human Services below.

ICND: See Indianapolis Coalition of Neighborhood Development below.

IDA: See Individual Development Account below.

IDEM: See Indiana Department of Environmental Management below.

IDI: See Indianapolis Downtown Incorporated below.

IEDC: See Indianapolis Regional Economic Development Partnership below.

IHA: See Indianapolis Housing Agency below.

IHFA: See Indiana Housing Finance Authority below.

IHPC: See Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission below.

IHTF: See Indianapolis Housing Task Force below.

ILP: See Improvement Location Permit below.

IMAGIS: See Indianapolis Mapping and Geographic Infrastructure System below.

IMCPL: See Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library below.

IMPACT: Indiana's Welfare to Work Initiative.

Improvement Location Permit (ILP): A "zoning clearance" permit issued by the Division of Permits of the Indianapolis Department of Metropolitan Development. Generally an ILP is required when a new structure is built, the bulk of an existing structure is increased, or a change in the use of property causes an increase in parking requirements. For more information contact the Division of Permits at 327-8700.

Indiana Association for Community Economic Development (IACED): A statewide nonprofit association for organizations who rebuild distressed communities. Activities include housing rehabilitation and construction; employment generation; real estate, industrial, and small business development; and social services.

Founded in 1986, IACED promotes and supports it's members efforts through training, technical assistance, and public policy advocacy. For more information contact IACED at 464-2044.

Indiana Association of United Ways (IAUW): A statewide coalition of 68 Indiana United Ways and United Funds working to build better communities by raising money for a number of priorities. The priorities include health care, economic issues, substance abuse, crisis intervention and emergency services, child care, abuse and neglect, crime and violence, mental health, education and literacy, and housing and homelessness. For more information contact IAUW at 923-2377.

Indiana Avenue Area: A neighborhood in the northwest part of downtown Indianapolis. See BOS Community Development Corporation above.

Indiana Coalition for Housing and Homeless Issues (ICHHI): ICHHI is a statewide association dedicated to the right of all Indiana citizens to safe, decent, and affordable housing; and necessary supportive services. The Coalition acts as a unifying entity for organizations and individuals dealing with affordable housing and homelessness by advocating change through elected officials and governmental agencies; and assisting local housing and homeless coalitions in development of affordable housing and homeless services. For more information contact ICHHI at 636-8819.

Indiana Coalition for Human Services (ICHS): ICHS is an association of organizations working to develop and promote comprehensive human services for Indiana residents by influencing public policy. Emphasis is given to human services which benefit low income and vulnerable persons. For more information contact ICHS at 921-1291.

Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM): A state agency responsible for dealing with issues related to air quality, ground contamination, solid waste, hazardous waste, and water quality. IDEM has responsibility for air quality issues as they relate to the Indianapolis region's long range transportation plans and the IRTIP. For more information contact IDEM at 232-8611.

Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT): A state agency responsible for aeronautics, public transportation, railroads, and highways in the state. INDOT has the primary responsibility, under ISTEA, to develop a statewide transportation improvement program for highways. For more information contact INDOT at 232-5533.

Indiana Economic Development Council: Indiana Economic Development Council is a non profit organization created in 1985 by the Indiana General Assembly to function as a think tank and consultant for the State of Indiana on economic development issues. For more information contact IEDC at 631-0871.

Indiana Housing Finance Authority (IHFA): A state agency which assists localities by making lower rate mortgage money available to first time home buyers and also by administering the state (HUD-funded) HOME Program and some CDBG affordable housing activities. For more information call IHFA at 232-7777.

Indiana Youth Institute (IYI): IYI is a non profit organization that promotes the future of youth in the State of Indiana. IYI reaches out to adults and organizations to develop practices and promote conditions which can provide youth with safe, healthy, and productive lives. For more information contact IYI at 924-3657.

Indianapolis Airport Authority (IAA): A body formed to administer and develop an air transportation system for Marion County and central Indiana. For more information call the IAA at 487-9594.

Indianapolis Coalition of Neighborhood Development (ICND): An association of Indianapolis community development corporations (CDCs) which facilitates the comprehensive redevelopment of Indianapolis center city neighborhoods by promoting communication, collaboration and cooperation among CDCs. ICND, through its 16 members, links CDCs with one another, with their institutional partners, and with the residents of Indianapolis neighborhoods to build economic opportunities and a strong community for all. For more information call ICND at 630-3113.

Indianapolis Downtown Incorporated (IDI): An agency created with the mission to address, in partnership with the public and private sectors, critical issues that affect the growth, well-being and user-friendliness of downtown Indianapolis. For more information contact IDI at 237-2222.

Indianapolis Economic Development Corporation (IEDC): See Indianapolis Regional Economic Development Partnership below.

Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission (IHPC): A nine-member mayor-appointed board. The mission of the IHPC and its professional staff is to work in cooperation with the City of Indianapolis to preserve both the character and fabric of historically significant areas and structures. The IHPC has jurisdiction over nine locally designated historic areas: Lockerbie Square, Fountain Square, The Old Northside, Herron-Morton Place, Chatham-Arch, Lockefield Gardens, Fletcher Place, St. Joseph, and the Wholesale District. For more information contact IHPC at 327-4406.

Indianapolis Home Challenge Fund: The Indianapolis Home Challenge Fund is being developed as a program aimed at establishing a comprehensive approach to securing resources for increasing access to affordable housing. The fund will be designed to support current providers and develop initiatives to fill gaps. The program will work with extremely low income, low income renters/first time home buyers, and low to moderate income home owners. For additional information contact INHP at 925-1400.

Indianapolis Housing Agency (IHA): An agency which maintains and operates eight housing complexes for low- income families and five apartment buildings for low-income Marion County residents who are elderly or disabled. For more information call 327- 8100.

Indianapolis Housing Task Force (IHTF): A broad based committee that will begin work in 1998 to discuss and make policy recommendations regarding a wide range of topics. A preliminary list of topics includes welfare to work, jobs in housing, transitional housing, HUD changes and how they may affect the city, and income diversification in housing. For more information call 327-5151.

Indianapolis Mapping and Geographic Infrastructure System (IMAGIS): The computerized map of Marion County that, when complete, will include information on soils, topography, zoning, utilities, and tax assessment for all parcels.

Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library (IMCPL): The first public library in Indianapolis was opened in the downtown area in 1873. Today the library has twenty-one branches and a bookmobile service providing information to all of Marion County. The library offers a wide range of materials and programs, not only to the over one half million Marion County residents registered as borrowers, but to others throughout central Indiana. In 1996 there were 1,714,960 items in the library's collection. For more information contact the library at 269-1700.

Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership (INHP): An agency that works to expand the supply of quality, affordable housing through leveraging public and private resources. INHP provides home ownership training, housing counseling, low cost loans, and also serves as the coordinating body for the community development corporations in the city. For more information contact INHP at 925-1400.

Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center (INRC): Works to strengthen the capacity of neighborhood-based organizations to effect positive change in their communities through training, support, and technical assistance. For more information contact INRC at 920-0330.

Indianapolis Police Department (IPD): The police department with boundaries that are coincident with the old city limits for the City of Indianapolis. IPD is a part of the Department of Public Safety. For more information contact IPD at 327-3149.

Indianapolis Private Industry Council (IPIC): A business-led organization serving as advisor, advocate, and agenda-setter for workforce development in Marion County, with interest in maintaining and increasing the economic vitality of the region. IPIC focuses on the increasing challenges confronting local employers; reflects the City of Indianapolis' pro-business, anti-red tape philosophy; seeks to creatively and effectively link job seekers with employers; has more than thirty public, private, and philanthropic funding sources for planning, administration, and oversight of specific workforce development programs; and serves as a broker of workforce resources to area service providers. For more information contact the IPIC at 639-4441.

Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS): The school corporation with boundaries that are coincident with the old city limits for the City of Indianapolis. For more information call IPS at 226-4000.

Indianapolis Regional Economic Development Partnership (IREDP): Formerly known as Indianapolis Economic Development Corporation, IEDC is a not-for-profit organization working as the sales organization to market the Indianapolis region. The IREDP mission is to serve as a catalyst for increased capital investment and quality job growth in the Indianapolis region.

The IREDP's primary goal is to serve as the sales organization to market the Indianapolis region. It is a client-focused organization serving targeted industry and decision-maker groups. As a regional organization, IREDP shows no preference for one location over another. The IREDP serves as an umbrella organization under which specific initiatives operate.· A division of the IREDP is the Marion County Economic Development organization, a LEDO (Local Economic Development Organization) similar to that existing in the other eight partner counties. This organization participates in existing business expansion and retention initiatives. Additionally, the IREDP houses divisions focused on responsibilities directly related to marketing the Indianapolis region. For more information contact IREDP at 236-6230.

Indianapolis Regional Transportation and Development Study (IRTADS): This report prepared in the late 1960s was a cooperative study in which local, state, and federal agencies pooled their financial resources and planning efforts to produce a coordinated and comprehensive plan. This plan had the purpose of considering all modes of urban transportation and directly relating the planning of transportation facilities to the planning of land use. IRTADS was designed to provide needed facts to guide the officials of the various governmental agencies in the investment of public funds in public work projects and to suggest priorities for needed transportation improvements.

Indianapolis Regional Transportation Council (IRTC): A cooperative group composed of all the planning jurisdictions within the metropolitan planning area which recommends to the MPO:

  1. Policies for the conduct of the transportation planning program.
  2. Transportation projects involving the federal-aid Surface Transportation Program.
  3. Mechanisms for the discussion and resolution of local transportation issues.

Indianapolis Regional Transportation Improvement Program (IRTIP): Presents transportation improvements proposed by government and transportation agencies in the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Area for a three year period. The current IRTIP covers 1998 through the year 2000. For more information contact Mike Dearing at 327-5139.

Indianapolis Urbanized Area (IUA): Census tracts in central Indiana that were identified as a part of the 1990 as making up urbanized area of Indianapolis. This area is smaller than the MPA. See map on page 2.

Individual Development Account (IDA): A new mechanism for asset accumulation similar to an IRA. IDAs can be opened at birth and used for such development purposes as education, home ownership, or starting a business. A key anti-poverty feature of IDAs is that poor households are assisted in building assets through matched deposits. In many cases IDAs are attached to job training, welfare reform, self-sufficiency, microenterprise, or other development programs. Eastside Community Investments had an early IDA demonstration program. The state has just initiated a $6 million, four-year, IDA program with six Indianapolis CDCs participating. Each dollar saved by qualified participants toward goals of higher education or training, business ownership or home ownership will be matched with a $3 deposit into their accounts from the state, up to a maximum match of $900 per account per year. The CDCs participating are Martindale-Brightwood CDC, Community Alliance of the Far Eastside, Concord CDC, Riley Area Development Corporation, Unity Resident Council, and West Indianapolis Development Corporation. The state program is administered through Redevelopment Services in the Community Development Division of the Indiana Department of Commerce. For more information, contact Kelly Wood at 233-0985.

INDOT: See Indiana Department of Transportation above.

Industrial Revenue Bond (IRB): Private companies may use industrial revenue bonds for fixed-asset financing. Because these bonds are tax exempt and offered at a lower rate of interest, they offer savings to the company financing the project.

IndyGo: Provides mass transit service to the Marion County area over fixed routes and uses scheduled times of arrival and departure. For more information call 635-2100.

Indy Parks: See Department of Parks and Recreation above.

Infrastructure: The underlying foundation or basic framework of a city, including streets, parks, bridges, sewers, street lights, and other utilities.

INHP: See Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership above.

INRC: See Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center above.

Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA): A federal program that governs all transportation planning and programming and rules that it "must be conducted cooperatively and in such a way as to provide for continuous and substantive public participation."

IPD: See Indianapolis Police Department above.

IPIC: See Indianapolis Private Industry Council above.

IPS: See Indianapolis Public Schools above.

IPTC or Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation or Metro: See IndyGo above.

IRB: See Industrial Revenue Bond above.

IRTADS: See Indianapolis Regional Transportation and Development Study above.

IRTC: See Indianapolis Regional Transportation Council above.

IRTIP: See Indianapolis Regional Transportation Improvement Program above.

Irvington Neighborhood: A neighborhood and commercial area east of downtown Indianapolis. Division of Planning staff prepared the Irvington Neighborhood Plan in 1986.

ISTEA: See Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act above.

IUA: See Indianapolis Urbanized Area above.

IYI: See Indiana Youth Institute above.

K

King Park Development Corporation: A community development corporation, which was established in 1987, north of downtown Indianapolis. Another name used to describe this neighborhood area is Citizens. King Park has played an active role in the revitalization of housing and the economic development of the Citizens neighborhood. In addition the Indianapolis Urban Enterprise Zone, which was established in 1990, covers the northern portion of the area. Smaller neighborhood organizations within the King Park area are Reagan Park Community Action Group, Citizens Neighborhood Coalition, the Old Northside Neighborhood Association, the New North Neighborhood Association, Friends and Neighbors, Christian Fellowship, and Herron Morton Place. For more information contact King Park at 684-8045.

L

Land Bank: A pool of acquired and assembled land in urban areas packaged into sites suitable for redevelopment.

Landmark: An individual, physical element that serves as a reference point in locating a node or district. The Soldiers and Sailors Monument is a good example of a landmark.

Lawrence Township: A 31,064 acre township located in the northeast part of Marion County. Lawrence Township had a 1980 population of 75,860 and a 1990 population of 94,548. The Lawrence Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1992. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Light Industrial: A land use plan category recommending industries that conduct their entire operations within completely enclosed buildings and do not have objectionable characteristics that extend beyond their property lines. Some examples are jewelry manufacturing and engraving, warehousing, construction companies, upholstering, paper box and paper products manufacturing from finished paper, and manufacturing of optical goods.

Linear Park: A land use plan category recommending public trails that can be located on or parallel to floodways, streams, parkways, wooded areas, and abandoned railroad rights-of-way or other public easements.

LISC: See Local Initiatives Support Corporation below.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC): The Ford Foundation's subsidiary organization, Local Initiatives Support Corporation, solicits corporate funding to support local non-profit neighborhood redevelopment programs, housing services, economic development, and technical assistance. For more information call LISC at 630-3113.

Low Density Residential: A land use plan category recommending 2 - 5 dwelling units per acre. Development may be single-family and two-family houses.

Low Income Housing Tax Credits: Low Income Housing Tax Credits A federally funded program whereby each state is allocated a prescribed amount of tax credits every year. The states then issue these tax credits to affordable housing developers who in turn sell the tax credits to investors who supply upfront equity for affordable rental projects. The investors receive a return on their investment through a tax credit they can take against their tax liability. They can take this credit for 10 years. The developer must guarantee that the units financed with these credits will remain affordable to households earning 60 percent of median family income or less for 15 years.

M

MAC: See Mayor's Action Center below.

MAGIC: See Metropolitan Association of Greater Indianapolis Communities below.

Mapleton-Fall Creek Neighborhood: A neighborhood umbrella organization north of downtown Indianapolis. See Mapleton-Fall Creek Housing Development Corporation below.

Mapleton-Fall Creek Housing Development Corporation: A community development corporation formed in 1985 north of downtown Indianapolis. Mapleton-Fall Creek Neighborhood Association is active in the area. Division of Planning staff prepared the Mapleton-Fall Creek Housing Improvement and Neighborhood Plan in 1991. This organization is a part of the NEI program described below. For more information contact Mapleton-Fall Creek Housing Development Corporation, 130 E. 30th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46205 at 923-5514.

Marion County: The county in which the city of Indianapolis is located. Marion County is 403 square miles and contains nine townships. The population of Marion County in 1980 was 765,233, and in 1990 it was 797,159 persons.

Marion County Alliance of Neighborhood Associations (MCANA): An voluntary organization of neighborhood associations in Marion County created to deal with common issues. For more information call Jerry King at 630-8536.

Marion County Commission on Youth (MCCOY): A non-profit agency identifying youth needs and setting priorities, convening diverse entities in order to solve problems, advocating on behalf of youth services, working with other coordinating efforts, serving as a clearinghouse, and planning for special events. For more information contact MCCOY at 921-1280.

Marion County Sheriff's Department (MCSD): The police agency for the portions of Marion County outside the excluded cities and not covered by the Indianapolis Police Department. For more information call MCSD at 231-8200.

Market Square Arena (MSA): An arena in downtown Indianapolis with the primary purpose as the home of the Indiana Pacers basketball team. MSA was opened in 1974 and has a seating capacity of 18,178. The Conseco Fieldhouse has replaced MSA as the home of the Pacers.

Martindale-Brightwood Community Development Corporation: A community development corporation formed in 1992 northeast of downtown Indianapolis. Neighborhood organizations within the Martindale-Brightwood area are Forest Manor Neighborhood Association, the Martindale-Brightwood Neighborhood Association, the Hillside Neighborhood Association, and the Oakhill Civic Association. In addition to the Martindale-Brightwood Community Development Corporation, a portion of the area is in the Indianapolis Urban Enterprise Zone, which was established by the Indiana Legislature in 1990. For more information contact Martindale-Brightwood Community Development Corporation, 2304 East 25th Street, Suite C, Indianapolis, IN 46218 at 924-8042.

Martindale-Brightwood Neighborhood: A neighborhood umbrella organization northeast of downtown Indianapolis. This organization is a part of the NEI program described below. See Martindale-Brightwood Community Development Corporation above.

Martin Luther King Community Development Corporation: A community development corporation, which was established in 1987, north of downtown Indianapolis. It contains portions of Butler-Tarkington, Meridian-Kessler, and Keystone Kessler neighborhoods. Neighborhood organizations that are active in the area are Fall Creek Civic League, Inc., the Keystone Communities Association, the Meridian- Kessler Neighborhood Association, the Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association, and the Keystone-Monon Neighborhood Partnership. For more information contact MLKCDC, 512 East 38th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46205 at 931-8090.

Mayor's Action Center (MAC): An agency that assists citizens of Indianapolis and Marion County in contacting and soliciting services from the city. The MAC takes complaints and requests for service, gives information, and provides regulations regarding abandoned buildings and vehicles, air pollution, dead animal pick-up, fallen trees and limbs, sewer and drainage problems, street and sidewalk maintenance, trash burning and dumping violations, and weed control. For more information call Joanna Batchelor at 327-4622.

MBE: See Minority Business Enterprise below.

MCANA: See Marion County Alliance of Neighborhood Associations above.

MCCOY: See Marion County Commission on Youth above.

McKinney Act: See Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act below.

MCSD: See Marion County Sheriff's Department above.

MDC: See Metropolitan Development Commission below.

MECA: See Metropolitan Emergency Communications Agency below.

MEDIC: A neighborhood in the northwest part of downtown Indianapolis. See BOS Community Development Corporation above.

Medium Density Residential: A land use plan category recommending 5 - 15 dwelling units per acre. Development may be single-family houses, two-family houses, and multi-family apartments.

Memorandum of Understanding: A written agreement that clarifies the enforcement roles and responsibilities of each agency in areas of shared authority.

Meridian Corridor: A name that generally describes the commercial area on Meridian Street from downtown Indianapolis to 40th Street. See Near North Community Development Corporation below.

Meridian-Kessler Neighborhood: A neighborhood north of downtown Indianapolis. Division of Planning staff prepared the Meridian-Kessler Subarea Plan in 1979.

Metadata: Defines what is known about a data set in terms of the content of the data set, it's accuracy, it's currency and who is responsible for maintenance.

Metro: See IndyGo above.

Metropolitan Area: The concept of a metropolitan area (MA) is one of a large population nucleus, together with adjacent communities that have a high degree of economic and social integration with that nucleus. Some MA's are defined around two or more nuclei. The MA classification is a statistical standard, developed for use by Federal agencies in the production, analysis, and publication of data on MA's. The MA's are designated and defined by the Federal Office of Management and Budget, following a set of official published standards.

Metropolitan Association of Greater Indianapolis Communities (MAGIC): A regional organization involving individuals within central Indiana to address issues affecting the business climate. For more information contact Lee Lewellen at 464-2243.

Metropolitan Development Commission (MDC): The policy-making body of the Department of Metropolitan Development. It has nine appointed members who serve a one-year term. For more information call 327-3698.

Metropolitan Emergency Communications Agency (MECA): The agency that handles all emergency communications for Marion County. For more information contact MECA at 327-5501.

Metropolitan Indianapolis Board of Realtors (MIBOR): A voluntary trade association for Indianapolis area real estate professionals. For more information contact MIBOR at 956-1912.

Metropolitan Planning Area (MPA): The portion of central Indiana that is expected to be urbanized in the next twenty years. It is the area studied by the MPO and includes all of Marion County and portions of the surrounding counties including the cities of Beech Grove, Indianapolis, Lawrence, Southport, and the town of Speedway. The boundary also includes portions of Hamilton, Boone, Hendricks, Johnson, and Hancock counties, including the municipalities of Fishers, Westfield, Whiteland, New Whiteland, and the cities of Carmel, Zionsville, Brownsburg, Plainfield, and Greenwood. This area is larger than the IUA. See map on page 2.

Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO): The Metropolitan Development Commission is the designated MPO for the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Area. The MPO has the responsibility, together with the state and IPTC, for the continuing, cooperative, and comprehensive transportation planning process required of urbanized areas to qualify for federal transportation funds. For more information contact Mike Peoni at 327-5133.

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA): A definition of central Indiana used to report Census information. Counties included in the MSA are Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Madison, Marion, Morgan, and Shelby. The MSA was formerly called the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area or SMSA. Madison County has been added to the MSA since the 1990 Census was prepared. The MSA had a 1980 population of 1,166,575 and a 1990 population of 1,249,822. See map on page 2.

MIBOR: See Metropolitan Indianapolis Board of Realtors above.

Midtown Neighborhood: A neighborhood in the northwest part of downtown Indianapolis. See BOS Community Development Corporation above.

Minority Business Enterprise (MBE): A business that is at least fifty-one percent owned by a minority or minorities who also control and operate the business.

Minority Participation Plan: A plan that invites the participation of those that differ from most of the population based on race, color, or national origin.

Mobile Dwelling: A land use plan category recommending a density of approximately 6 dwelling units per acre. Development may be in the form of a mobile home park.

Model Cities: A HUD program of the late 1960s and early 1970s aimed at establishing comprehensive improvement strategies in distressed neighborhoods. In Indianapolis the Model Cities program area was focused in the Citizens and Martindale-Brightwood neighborhoods.

MPA: See Metropolitan Planning Area above.

MPO: See Metropolitan Planning Organization above.

MSA: See Metropolitan Statistical Area or Market Square Arena above.

Multiple Family Development: Housing units in a structure containing 3 or more housing units.

N

NAICS: See North American Industrial Classification System below.

Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC): A defense plant on the east side of Indianapolis that opened in 1942. At its wartime peak, this facility employed nearly 7,000 people in the development of the Norden Bomb Sight, which was used for precision bombing in support of Allied forces. In 1945 the Naval Bureau of Ordinance took over the facility from the private contractor. In 1995 the federal government decided to close this base. Since the closure decision was made, the Navy worked with the local community in investigating the possibility of privatization of the facility as an alternative to closure. Hughes Technical Services Company was selected in 1996 to acquire the facility. They began operations at the site in January of 1997.

NAWC: See Naval Air Warfare Center above.

Near Eastside: A neighborhood area east of downtown Indianapolis. See Eastside Community Investments above.

Near Eastside Community Organization (NESCO): A neighborhood umbrella organization east of downtown Indianapolis. This organization is a part of the NEI program described below. See Eastside Community Investments above.

Near North Community Development Corporation: A community development corporation, which was established in 1978. Near North is generally oriented along North Meridian Street in downtown Indianapolis and north to 40th Street. The CDC has been involved in numerous commercial and residential revitalization projects in the Near North area. Neighborhood organizations in Near North are Meridian- Highland Neighborhood Association and Highland Vicinity Neighborhood Association. This area is a part of the NEI program described below. The Division of Planning prepared the North Meridian Corridor-Section Six Plan in 1986 and the Near North/Fall Creek Plan in 1993. For more information contact Near North Development Corporation, 1800 North Meridian Street, Suite 100, Indianapolis, IN 46202 at 927-9881.

Nearwestside Neighborhood: A neighborhood in the west of downtown Indianapolis. See Westside Community Development Corporation below.

NEEDS: See Neighborhood Environmental Evaluation and Decision System below.

NEI: See Neighborhood Enhancement Initiative below.

Neighborhood Enhancement Initiative (NEI): A series of programs initiated by Mayor Goldsmith that were designed to strengthen several low-income neighborhoods located in the core of Indianapolis. These projects consisted of the development of neighborhood umbrella associations, creation of neighborhood coordinator positions, and the allocation of a portion of Community Development Block Grant funds to the umbrella associations for neighborhood projects. Assistance for this program is provided by the grants management team of the Division of Community Development and Financial Services administers. For more information call 327-5151.

Neighborhood Environmental Evaluation and Decision System (NEEDS): A four stage sampling approach to environmental management developed by the U.S. Bureau of Community Environmental Management, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Department of Health, Education and Welfare. A report based on the Indianapolis findings was printed in 1972. In essence, the program was a uniform technique of collecting a wide range of data which made possible evaluation and remediation of environmental factors which adversely effect the quality of life in Indianapolis. The specific objectives of the program were to provide:

  1. A baseline data collection method for evaluation of environmental and personal health conditions.
  2. Planning data for effective dollar use in preventive environmental health measures.
  3. Data necessary for health problem projections.

Neighborhood Park: A land use plan category recommending a park of between 5 and 25 acres that serves the immediately surrounding neighborhood. A neighborhood park usually includes facilities for basketball, tennis, picnicking, and a playground.

Neighborhood Shopping Center: A land use plan category recommending a commercial center on one parcel that usually has a grocery store or drugstore as an anchor.

NESCO: See Near Eastside Community Organization above.

New Urbanism: Community design that borrows from traditional city planning concepts, particularly those of the years 1900-1920, and applies them to modern living. New urbanism integrates housing, shops, workplaces, parks, and civic facilities into close-knit communities that are walkable and have ready access to transit. Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Peter Calthorpe are considered the pioneers of this method of community design.

NIMBY: See Not in My Back Yard below.

NOFA: See Super NOFA below.

North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS): Replacing the SIC system, the NAICS is a system of employment classification developed for the purpose of facilitating the collection, tabulation, presentation, and analysis of data relating to employment and for promoting uniformity and comparability in the presentation of statistical data collected by various agencies of the United States Government, state agencies, trade associations, and private research organizations. The NAICS is intended to cover the entire field of economic activities: agriculture, forestry, fishing, hunting and trapping; mining and construction; manufacturing; transportation, communications, electric, gas, and sanitary services; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; personal, business, professional, repair, recreation, and other services; and public administration.

North Meridian Corridor: See both Meridian Corridor and Near North Community Development Corporation above.

Not in My Back Yard (NIMBY): Land uses that most people don't want near their homes, such as power plants and junk yards.

O

Objective: A quantifiable refinement of a goal or means of achieving a goal. Objectives often relate to more than one goal.

Office Buffer Commercial: A land use plan category recommending low intensity office uses such as medical services, insurance, real estate, legal services, and other similar office uses. Buildings are generally one or two story.

Office Center Commercial: A land use plan category recommending office park type development that generally includes three or more buildings and an internal road system. Buildings are generally more than two stories.

OIC: See Opportunities Industrialization Centers below.

Opportunities Industrialization Centers (OIC): An agency that provides a wide range of services including adult education, child care, vocational training, job search and placement services, and other services that directly impact upon the ability of the poor, unemployed, and disadvantaged to prepare for and secure viable jobs. Also OIC is involved in an economic development project, Genesis Plaza, in the Martindale-Brightwood neighborhood of Indianapolis. Technical assistance and community needs assessments are offered to communities by OIC staff. The Indiana OIC State Council, incorporated in 1978, is a part of OIC America, Inc. For more information contact OIC at 924-9440.

Ozone Awareness Program: A public information program of the MPO staff with the purpose of helping to educate the public about the ozone program and enlisting their aid in dealing with the issue. The campaign includes a wide range of educational components such as brochures, radio and television spots, a toll-free information line (1-888-DJA-KNOW), various public relations activities, a KNOZONE web page( www.knozone.com ), and reduced transit fares on weekday NOZONE Action Days. The goal is to have cleaner air in Indianapolis and avoid the further federal regulations that may be imposed if air quality is not improved.

P

Perry Township: A 29,420 acre township located in the south central part of Marion County. Perry Township had a 1980 population of 78,485 and a 1990 population of 85,060. The Perry Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1992. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Pike Township: A 28,140 acre township located in the northwest part of Marion County. Pike Township had a 1980 population of 25,336 and a 1990 population of 45,204. The Pike Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1993. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Planned Unit Development (PUD): A development which, for zoning approval purposes, is not judged by typical zoning standards but on the basis of an overall plan for the total development. To be approved by the zoning review agency, the plan must include detailed information regarding such issues as land use, building height, density, and setbacks at the overall edge of the development.

Polis Center, The: A research center of Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. Polis deals with issues in religion, education, race relations, social values, social services, information technologies, economic development, and other areas. The Center works with private citizens, public officials, clergy and parishioners, and with leaders from neighborhood, cultural, historical, and educational organizations. One of the more significant products from Polis to date is The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. For more information contact Polis at 274-2455.

Program: A proposal with an end product that is not physical in nature but is a plan for dealing with an issue. Programs are direct outgrowths of objectives.

Project: A proposal with an end product that is physical in nature. As with programs, projects are direct outgrowths of objectives.

Project 180: Administered by Keep Indianapolis Beautiful with support from the City of Indianapolis and the Indianapolis Power and Light Company's Revive A Neighborhood Program, Project 180 brings a variety of supplemental resources to support other neighborhood activities ranging from clean-up campaigns to rehabilitation projects. Project 180 resources include financial assistance as well as volunteer efforts. For more information call 327-7000.

Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS): Information that comes from computer accessible files which furnish nearly all of the detailed information recorded on the long-form questionnaires administered as a part of the Census. With this information users can construct an infinite variety of tabulations interrelating any desired set of variables. For more information regarding PUMS contact at 327-5848.

PUD: See Planned Unit Development above.

PUMS: See Public Use Microdata Samples above.

Purdue Cooperative Extension Service of Marion County: The non-formal educational arm of Purdue University. Its primary mission is to bring research-based knowledge to the people to help them address problems. It offers services in leadership and volunteer development; citizenship, public issues, and community development; science education; career development and workforce preparation; environmental stewardship and natural resources; business development and technical assistance; diet, nutrition, and health; and family strength and resilience. For more information contact the Purdue Cooperative Extension Service at 848-7351.

Q

Quality of Life: The attributes or amenities that combine to make an area a good place to live. Examples include the availability of political, educational, and social support systems; good relations among constituent groups; a healthy physical environment; and economic opportunities for both individuals and businesses.

R

RARP: See Riley Area Revitalization Program below.

RC: See Regional Center below.

Redevelopment Area: Areas that are designated for redevelopment by the MDC and administered by DMD. Establishing a redevelopment area allows government to accomplish a wide variety of public goals. A variety of tools can be used in the districts to acquire and assemble land (including eminent domain), prepare it for disposition, write-down acquisition costs, make needed area improvements, and assist developers and property owners in improving their property.

Redevelopment/Revitalization of the Southside (R/ROS): A community development corporation formed in 1996 southeast of downtown Indianapolis. In 1996, the community undertook a process to prepare a plan for the R/ROS neighborhood. The plan was completed and adopted by the Metropolitan Development Commission in 1998. Smaller neighborhood organizations in the R/ROS area are the South East Community Organization, Southeast Side Triangle Community Neighborhood Association, and Granville and Vicinity. For more information contact R/ROS at 784-5176.

Regional Center (RC): A 5.8 square mile area bounded by I-65 and a line extending west from I-65 on the north, I-65 and I-70 on the east, I-70 on the south, and the previously proposed alignment of Harding Street improvements on the west. Plans were prepared for this area in 1970, 1980, and 1990.

Regional Park: A land use plan category recommending a park of 100 acres or more that serves a population within a one hour driving distance. A regional park usually includes facilities such as play areas, picnic areas, shelters, nature centers, and trails. They also usually include rivers, lakes, or other natural features to provide the park users a natural retreat from the urban environment.

Regional Transportation Plan (RTP): This plan guides the development of the area's transportation system for the next 25 years. It is developed through the cooperation of citizens, planners, engineers, and public officials.

Rehab Resource: An agency dedicated to providing building materials for the repair and rehabilitation of existing housing and the construction of new, affordable housing for low- to moderate-income residents. Donations of high-quality building materials are sought from private businesses, including manufacturers, suppliers and contractors. The materials are then redistributed to CDCs and other non- profit organizations who work on behalf of low- to moderate-income families. Individuals may get building materials from Rehab Resources with a referral from any member agency. There is a nominal handling fee to cover the cost of the warehouse operations. For more information contact Rehab Resource at 637-3701.

Request for Proposal (RFP): Public agencies use the RFP process to solicit proposals for new projects and programs. An example is that the RFP process is frequently used when a municipality seeks a developer for publicly-owned property. There is a public advertisement of the type of development being sought, and interested firms may submit information explaining why their firm is the best qualified to develop the property. A selection is then made based on the proposals submitted.

Request for Qualifications (RFQ): Public agencies use the RFQ process to solicit information regarding individuals or firms that might provide professional services to the agency. An example is that the RFQ process is frequently used when a municipality seeks to hire an architect or engineering firm. There is a public advertisement of the services being sought, and interested firms may submit information explaining why their firm is the best qualified to perform the services. A selection is then made based on the qualifications submitted.

Rezoning: Changing the zoning on a particular piece of property.

RFP: See Request for Proposal above.

RFQ: See Request for Qualifications above.

Riley Area Revitalization Program (RARP): A community development corporation formed in 1979 in the northeast part of downtown Indianapolis. Smaller neighborhoods within Riley Area include the Chatham Arch Neighborhood Association, Cole-Noble Commercial Arts District, St. Joseph Historic Neighborhood Association, and Lockerbie Square People's Club. For more information contact Riley Area Revitalization Program, 215 East Saint Joseph Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 at 637-8996.

R/ROSS: See Redevelopment/Revitalization of the South Side above.

RTP: See Regional Transportation Plan above.

Rural Housing Service: The Rural Housing Service of USDA Rural Development works to improve the quality of life for rural Americans by offering access to safe, well constructed, and affordable housing.

S

SAVI: See Social Assets and Vulnerability Indicators below.

SEND: See South East Neighborhood Development below.

Section 501(c)(3): An Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax-exempt designation for certain non-profit organizations.

Section Six: A term used to describe the North Meridian Corridor from 30th to 40th Street. Near North Development Corporation originally had five areas of interest, or sections. The "Sixth Section" was added when it was determined that the 30th to 40th Street portion should be included as an area of interest. The Division of Planning prepared the North Meridian Corridor- Section Six Plan in 1986.

Section 8 Certificate: Rental assistance for very low income (50% or less of median family income) or elderly households. Provided by HUD through local housing authorities. Recipients may choose a rental unit that suits their household needs and only pay 30% of their household income. HUD makes up the difference between the 30% and fair market rent.

Seven Target Neighborhoods: A group of Center Township neighborhoods, with a combined 1990 population of over 110,000 people, that were identified in 1992 as providing good opportunities for sustainable improvement. The original seven geographic areas were United Northwest Area, Citizens, Highland-Brookside, Near North/Mapleton-Fall Creek, Southeastern, Martindale- Brightwood, and the Nearwestside. Near North and Mapleton-Fall Creek are now identified as two separate neighborhoods making a total number of eight neighborhoods. Certain city programs have been focused on these eight geographic areas. A recent example is the NEI program described above.

Single Room Occupancy (SRO): A method of providing housing for homeless people that some cities have used. Often an old hotel building is modified to provide one person per room, permanent housing.

SMSA or Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area: See Metropolitan Statistical Area above.

Social Assets and Vulnerability Indicators (SAVI): The Community Service Council and The Polis Center have developed a database of information from sources such as the U.S. Census, the Indianapolis Police Department, the Marion County Sheriff's Department, the Family and Social Services Administration, and the Marion County Health Department. Information in this database can be displayed on a Marion County map. This database includes information about the people that live in Marion and their social condition. For more information contact the Community Service Council at 923-1466 or Polis at 274-2455.

Southeastern Neighborhood: A neighborhood and commercial area southeast of downtown Indianapolis. Other names used to describe this neighborhood area are South East Neighborhood Development (SEND), Southeastern Neighborhood, and Southeast Umbrella Organization (SUMO). Smaller neighborhoods within the Southeastern neighborhood area are Coburn Block, Fletcher Place Neighborhood Association, Fountain Square Neighborhood Association, Friends of Historic Fountain Square, South East Community Organization, and Garfield Station. The Division of Planning prepared the Southeastern Housing Improvement and Neighborhood Plan in 1993. For more information contact SEND at 634-5079.

South East Neighborhood Development (SEND): A community development corporation formed in 1993 by combining the Fountain Square/Fletcher Place Investment Corporation and Fountain Square Church and Community Project. These two former community development corporations and now SEND have played an active role in improving the quality of life for those who live, work, and shop in the area. For more information contact SEND, 1831 Prospect Street, Indianapolis, IN 46203 at 634-5079.

A neighborhood area southeast of downtown Indianapolis. Another name used to describe this general neighborhood area is the R/ROS area. See Redevelopment/ Revitalization of the Southside above.

Southeast Umbrella Organization (SUMO): A neighborhood umbrella organization southeast of downtown Indianapolis. This organization is a part of the NEI program described above. The service area of SUMO is in the South East Neighborhood Development (SEND) or Southeastern neighborhood area.

Special Use: A land use plan category recommending a wide variety of special uses including churches, schools, government property, power substations, switching stations, non-profit agencies, nursing homes, hospitals, union halls, and cemeteries.

SPIRIT: See Strategic Plan for Indianapolis Residents Investing in Tomorrow below.

SRO: See Single Room Occupancy above.

Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act or McKinney Act: Congress enacted this legislation in 1987 to establish distinct assistance programs for the growing numbers of homeless persons. Recognizing the variety of causes of homelessness, the original McKinney Act authorized twenty programs offering a multitude of services, including emergency food and shelter, transitional and permanent housing, education, job training, mental health care, primary health care services, substance abuse treatment, and veterans' assistance services. The six programs administered by HUD are: Emergency Shelter Grants Program (ESG), Supportive Housing Demonstration Program (SHDP), Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation for Single-Room Occupancy Dwellings (SROs), Supplemental Assistance to Facilities to Assist the Homeless, Single Family Property Disposition Initiative (SFPDI), and Shelter Plus Care.

Strategic Plan for Indianapolis Residents Investing in Tomorrow (SPIRIT): A study commissioned to review the human service needs of the city. The results of the committee's work were published in a report in February of 1991.

Sub-Neighborhood Park: A land use plan category recommending a park of between 1/4 and 5 acres that usually serves a specific age group within the immediate neighborhood. Facilities may include a playground, sitting area, and multi-purpose game area.

SUMO: See Southeast Umbrella Organization above.

Super NOFA: NOFA stands for notice of funding availability. For the past two years, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded funding for the Supportive Housing Program, the Shelter Plus Care Program, and the Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation SRO Program for homeless individuals through a combined application process or "Super NOFA ".

Support Continuum: See Continuum of Care above.

T

TANF: See Temporary Assistance For Needy Families

Tax Abatement: A reduction in taxes granted to a property owner in a locally designated Economic Revitalization Area who makes improvements to real property or installs new manufacturing equipment. Used manufacturing equipment can also qualify as long as such equipment is new to the State of Indiana. Equipment not used in direct production, such as office equipment, does not qualify for abatement. Land does not qualify for abatement.

Tax Exempt Bonds: Bonds issued on the stock market to raise capital for public investments at an interest rate below the market value. Capital gains with these bonds are not taxed by the federal government.

Tax Increment Financing (TIF): A method of raising additional capital within declared districts to pay for needed improvements within those districts. The districts are established by the Metropolitan Development Commission. The base of existing assessed valuation is frozen with the incremental revenues obtained by the taxes on new development in the TIF District then becoming available to fund improvement projects.

TDR: See Transfer of Development Rights below.

teMPO: A quarterly newsletter prepared by the MPO to keep the public informed of its activities. For more information or to receive copies of teMPO, call Mike Peoni at 327-5133.

TIF: See Tax Increment Financing above.

TIS: See Traffic Impact Study below.

TMS: See Transportation Monitoring System below.

Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF): The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, replacing the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program and giving states flexibility to create new cash assistance programs for families with children. While the federal legislation establishes a variety of minimum requirements in some areas, there is considerable flexibility for states to exceed these minimum requirements and a number of areas are open to state discretion.

TND: See Traditional Neighborhood Design below.

Township Administrators: The Department of Metropolitan Development has assigned a Township Administrator to each of the nine townships within Marion County. The Township Administrators provide assistance in establishing new neighborhood organizations, bring community groups together which may benefit from combining forces in addressing common issues, attend community meetings to hear citizen and business concerns first hand and address them with the appropriate government officials, and educate the public on zoning ordinance interpretation and land use issues and how they can participate in the zoning process. Also Township Administrators assist merchants in business expansion or relocation focusing on the economic needs of the community; assist in locating vacant properties and buildings; provide businesses with applicable zoning ordinances, re-zoning, and variance information; provide information about permitting issues; and assist in the formation of new merchants organizations. In addition, Township Teams have been established under the direction of the Township Administrators. The teams are comprised of representatives from several City agencies and meet regularly to address community interests within their townships. This team concept allows issues to be raised before a broad base of City agencies whose combined expertise promotes a coordinated approach to addressing community affairs. For more information call 327-5039.

Township Teams: See Township Administrators above.

Traditional Neighborhood Design (TND): Neighborhood design that uses the principles of the new urbanism movement. See New Urbanism above.

Traffic Calming: Usually a component of traditional neighborhood design, traffic calming uses physical design features, such as street trees, landscaping bump outs, and textured pavement to slow down automobile traffic passing through neighborhood areas. The intention is to improve the quality of life in urban neighborhoods and to make neighborhoods more pedestrian friendly.

Traffic Impact Study (TIS): An analysis of certain new developments to determine the impact on the surrounding transportation system. For more information call Steve Cunningham at 327-5403.

Transfer of Development Rights (TDR): A program that allows landowners to transfer the right to develop one parcel of land to a more suitable parcel of land. TDR programs establish "sending area" and "receiving areas" for development rights.

Transportation Monitoring System (TMS): A systematic process for the collection, analysis, summary, and retention of roadway related person and vehicular traffic data, including public transportation on public highways and streets. The goal of TMS is to develop a comprehensive compilation of available transportation and traffic data for the region while satisfying the intent of the regulations outlined in ISTEA. ISTEA specifies that the TMS shall cover all public roads except those functionally classified as local or rural minor collectors or those that are federally owned. For more information call Sweson Yang at 327-5137.

Transportation System Management (TSM): A study that looked at ways to maximize the efficiency of the existing transportation system by relatively low cost means such as signal improvements and turning lanes. TSM has been replaced by the Congestion Management System.

TSM: See Transportation System Management above.

U

UBC: See Uniform Building Code below.

UDAP: See User Defined Area Program below.

UEA: See Urban Enterprise Association below.

UEZ or Urban Enterprise Zone: See Urban Enterprise Association below.

Underground Storage Tank (UST): A storage tank that is buried under the ground similar to ones used at gasoline service stations. Many have been used to store materials that are considered hazardous. New standards require the removal of older tanks that may leak and pollute the surrounding area.

UNECDC: See United North East Community Development Corporation below.

Unified Planning Program (UPP): A comprehensive planning program developed by the Department of Metropolitan Development, Division of Planning and Zoning in the late 1960s. It covered a wide range of subject areas, from administration through the preparation and implementation of plans and programs in economic, social, environmental, and physical development. Until recently all work of the Division was organized by UPP numbers.

Uniform Building Code (UBC): National building construction standards first developed in 1927 for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of the building occupants. The UBC was designed to create greater safety to the public by providing uniformity in building laws. Topics covered in the code include fire safety, appropriate use of building materials, size of public spaces, and special hazards. The UBC is the basis for the State's review of certain types of new construction. For more information contact Fire and Building Services at 232-6422.

UNIGOV: Title 36, Article 3 of the State of Indiana Code detailing the combined governments of the City of Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana. Effective January 1, 1970, UNIGOV legislation permitted the City of Indianapolis to provide most municipal services county wide.

The City Council and the County Council were joined to become the City-County Council. The structure of the UNIGOV legislation was divided into three branches similar to the federal government: the executive branch consisted of the Mayor and other administrators; the legislative branch consisted of the City-County Council; and the judicial branch consisted of the court system.

Unique: The United North East Community Development Corporation (UNECDC) is sometimes referred to as "Unique.".

United North East Community Development Corporation (UNECDC): A community development corporation formed in 1996 northeast of downtown Indianapolis. The UNECDC was founded by residents, business owners/representatives, and social service representatives who serve the United North East area. The UNECDC provides housing repairs, homeowner education, housing counseling, technical assistance to small businesses, community workshops, community and economic development incentives, and information and referral services. Smaller neighborhood organizations in the UNECDC area are Crosstown Community, Emerson Avenue Area Civic Alliance, Inc., Forest Manor Community Development Corp., Forest Manor Neighborhood Association, Forest Manor-South Gladstone Area Community Organization, Friends and Neighbors, Keystone-Orchard Neighborhood Association, Meadows-Fall Creek Civic League, and Rosecrest Neighborhood Association. The Division of Planning prepared the United North East Neighborhood Plan in 1997. For more information contact UNECDC, 3636 East 38th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46218 at 546-6240.

United Northwest Area Development Corporation: A community development corporation formed in 1979 northwest of downtown Indianapolis. Access to information from all sectors of this community is a key strength of the organization. Residents are involved in, and supportive of, the work of the CDC, which has primarily focused on housing (i.e., major repairs for owner-occupants, rehab to create affordable rental units, and a lease-to-buy program for first time homeowners). Smaller neighborhood organizations in the UNWADC area are the Northwest Neighborhood Planning and Development Corporation; the Riverside Civic League; the North West Way Civic Association; Neighbors Helping Neighbors; the Concerned Neighborhood Association, Inc.; and the Crown Hill Neighborhood Association. For more information contact United Northwest Area Development Corporation, 1007 West 30th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208 at 924-0199.

United Northwest Area, Incorporated (UNWA): A neighborhood umbrella organization northwest of downtown Indianapolis. This organization is a part of the NEI program described above. The service area of UNWA is in the United Northwest Area Development Corporation area. See description above. For more information contact United Northwest Area at 924-5786.

UNWA: See United Northwest Area Development Corporation above.

UPARR : See Urban Parks and Recreation Recovery Program below.

UPP: See Unified Planning Program above.

Urban Conservation: A land use plan category given to land possessing special environmental or valuable natural characteristics, such as wetlands, woodlands, and aquifers.

Urban Enterprise Association (UEA): A statutory enterprise zone established by the Indiana Legislature in 1990, that is governed by a twelve-member board comprised of the public and private sector. Economic development and employment are the primary goals set forth in its strategic plan. The UEA has assisted in the training and employment of many residents. The UEA has created new jobs by attracting businesses to the zone and helping existing businesses increase employment of zone residents. Both state and local governments have empowered the UEA with tax incentives that facilitate the attraction of new business. For more information call 541-2740.

Urban Insurance Partners Foundation: The Urban Insurance Partners Foundation promotes the availability of property and casualty insurance in America's urban communities. For more information contact 876-6213.

Urban Parks and Recreation Recovery Program (UPARR): A program of the National Park Service, federal Department of the Interior from the early 1980s. In Indianapolis UPARR funded planning studies that included Parks, Recreation, and Open Space - A Comprehensive Guide for Community Action, with supplemental reports providing information on park related demographics, a survey of recreation center users, and a survey of swimming pool users.

User Defined Area Program (UDAP): Standardized, computer produced narratives based on the results of the 1990 Census of Population and Housing . They provide information for a number of Indianapolis neighborhoods. For more information regarding the UDAP contact Bob Wilch at 327-5115.

UST: See Underground Storage Tank above.

V

Value: An ideal, custom, institution, etc. that the people of a society try to achieve.

Variance: Exceptions to current zoning laws.

Very Low Density Residential: A land use plan category recommending 0 - 2 dwelling units per acre. Development may be single-family houses with two-family houses permitted on corner lots.

Vision Statement: A vivid, imaginative conception of the future.

W

Warren Township: A 30,986 acre township located in the east central part of Marion County. Warren Township had a 1980 population of 89,208 and a 1990 population of 87,989. The Warren Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1992. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Washington Township: A 31,795 acre township located in the north central part of Marion County. Washington Township had a 1980 population of 129,008 and a 1990 population of 133,969. The Washington Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1993. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

Wayne Township: A 31,227 acre township located in the west central part of Marion County. Wayne Township had a 1980 population of 122,809 and a 1990 population of 125,699. The Wayne Township portion of the comprehensive land use plan for Marion County was last updated in 1993. For more information contact Keith Holdsworth at 327-5114.

WBE: See Women Business Enterprise below.

WCDC: See Westside Community Development Corporation below.

Weed and Seed: A program initiated by the U.S. Department of Justice in 1992 with the purpose of "weeding out" violent crime, drug dealers, gang activity, and restoring neighborhoods through social and economic revitalization. Neighborhoods presently involved in the Indianapolis program are UNWA, Near North/Mapleton-Fall Creek, Highland-Brookside, and the Nearwestside. For more information call 327-5039.

Wellfield: A tract of land that contains one or more wells used for the production of drinking water for the public water supply. For information regarding the protection of Indianapolis wellfields contact 327-5151.

WESCO: See Westside Cooperative Organization below.

West Indianapolis Development Corporation (WIDC): A community development corporation formed in 1993 southwest of downtown Indianapolis. WIDC has been involved in projects to improve the quality of life in the west Indianapolis area. Another name used to describe this neighborhood area is West Indianapolis Neighborhood Congress (WINC). For more information contact WIDC, 1211 S. Hiatt Street, Indianapolis, IN 46221 at 638-9432.

West Indianapolis Neighborhood Congress (WINC): A neighborhood umbrella organization southwest of downtown Indianapolis. Another name used to describe this neighborhood area is West Indianapolis Development Corporation (WIDC). The West Indianapolis neighborhood has traditionally been identified by smaller residential areas, such as the Hill, the Valley, the Little Valley, the Mt. Jackson area, the Hollow, and the Bottoms.

Westside Community Development Corporation (WCDC): A community development corporation formed in 1985 west of downtown Indianapolis. WCDC administers numerous housing and improvement programs in the area. Programs are designed to address the needs of homeowners, renters, and the homeless (transitional housing). Smaller neighborhood organizations in the WCDC area are the Haughville Community Council, Neighbors for Historic Haughville, Hawthorne Neighborhood Association, Stringtown Neighborhood Association Council, and Concord Village Resident Council. The Division of Planning prepared the Nearwestside Housing Improvement and Neighborhood Plan in 1994. For more information contact WCDC at 684-0611.

Westside Cooperative Organization (WESCO): A neighborhood umbrella organization west of downtown Indianapolis. This organization is a part of the NEI program described above. Other names used to describe this neighborhood area is the Nearwestside neighborhood and Westside Community Development Corporation area. For more information contact WESCO at 327-7902.

Wetlands: Land that has wet or spongy soil. These areas are often important wildlife habitats.

WIDC: See West Indianapolis Development Corporation above.

WINC: See West Indianapolis Neighborhood Congress above.

Women Business Enterprise (WBE): A business that is at least fifty-one percent owned by a woman or women who also control and operate the business.

Y

Youthbuild: A program providing funds for a wide range of activities and services to assist low income youth in the areas of education and job training. More information on this Department of Housing and Urban Development program can be obtained at 226-6303.